Archive for the ‘Books’ Category

~ Shambhala Publications Book Launch ~

The Just King

The Tibetan Buddhist Classic on Leading an Ethical Life

By Jamgön Mipham, Translated by José Ignacio Cabezón

The Buddhist luminary Jamgön Mipham wrote a letter on leadership to the king of Dergé, whose small kingdom straddled China and Tibet during a particularly turbulent period. This work stresses compassion, impartiality, self-control, and virtue as essential for long-lasting success—whether as a leader or an individual trying to live a meaningful life. Both present-day leaders and those they lead will find this classic work, finally available in English, profoundly illuminating on political, societal, and personal levels.

Join us for some refreshments, snacks, and a discussion with Professor José Cabezón on ethical leadership according to the great Tibetan master Mipham.

When: June 4, 6pm

Where: Shambhala Publications event space and book store, 4720 Walnut Street, Boulder, CO 80301

Shambhala Logo


Nikko Odiseos
at Shambhala Publications has shared some very interesting remarks about the state of Buddhist publishing. It is well worth the read on VajrayanaWorld.com

Here is a little excerpt and link to read more:

In 2016, Shambhala alone published 35 titles for Tibetan Buddhists (and a bunch more for Zen and Pali traditions), bringing us to 530 Tibetan Buddhist titles in print. While we have by far the largest list, the other Buddhist-centric publishers add a bit over two hundred more to the total. Some of the greatest works of the Indian and Tibetan traditions are coming out on an almost monthly basis.

The Ten Volume Treasury of Knowledge

The Ten Volume Treasury of Knowledge

There are many experienced translators who have good retreat experience and who work closely with lamas who have traversed the path. Vast, multi-volume works are available for many traditions, such as the ten-volume Treasury of Knowledge, the Complete Nyingma Tradition (eventually seven volumes and by far the largest work on a single tradition), the Treasury of Precious Instructions(eventually eighteen volumes) and the Library of Tibetan Classics series (Wisdom Publications). There are multiple translations and commentaries on the five Maitreya texts, the core of the Mahayana. There is the 84000 project (84000.com) committed to translating the entire Kangyur (the words of the Buddha) and Tengyur (the commentaries from India), even if few teachers teach those texts and few people read them.

Other publishers including WisdomRangjung YeshePadma PublishingKTDVajra Books, Dharma Publishing (despite nothing new in years), and a few others have very dedicated people producing some important books. Even some of the university presses (Oxford, Columbia, Chicago, SUNY, and Hawaii in particular) are making some great contributions beneficial—or at least of interest—to practitioners, not just academics. There are also some very important behind-the-scenes organizations that really enable a lot of the important works coming out to happen—the Tsadra Foundation, the Hershey Foundation, the Khyentse Foundation, the Ho Foundation, and more, as well some private donors supporting translators and publishing projects. Tibetan texts are also widely available to translators and readers thanks in particular to the Tibetan Buddhist Resource Center online library.

Thanks to our many teachers, translators, scholars, and sponsors, we have so much Buddhist material at our fingertips. There is a lot to feel very hopeful and positive about, not just about the books, but about authentic Dharma being made available both inside and outside of Asia.

Yet, as I survey the landscape of Buddhism in the West through the lens of Buddhist publishing in English, at times I have a lot of trepidation—as a publisher and also as a Buddhist. We have a long way to go. My concerns focus on how we read, what we read, and who is reading—or not.

CONTINUE READING ON VajrayanaWorld.com

 

New Tibetan Books!

Usually we have a steady stream of small amounts of Tibetan texts and academic works on Buddhism and Tibet coming into our library, but recently we welcomed a doubling of the Tibetan texts held in the Boulder research library. I will try to give a sense of what has arrived recently in a few posts here.

On the top of the shelves you can see our recently rebound version of the Narthang Kangyur. Many of the other texts on the shelves are various series from Paltsek Research  དཔལ་བརྩེགས་བོད་ཡིག་དཔེ་རྙིང་ཞིབ་འཇུག་ཁང་།.

Tibetan Library

Tibetan Library 2

Recent Arrivals from དཔལ་བརྩེགས་ :

rngog slob brgyud dang bcas pa'i gsung 'bum-FrontCover

རྔོག་སློབ་བརྒྱུད་དང་བཅས་པའི་གསུང་འབུམ། rngog slob brgyud dang bcas pa’i gsung ‘bum/ 34 volumes. Krung go’i bod rig pa dpe skrun khang, 2011.

Ras chung snyan brgyud skor-FrontCover

རས་ཆུང་སྙན་བརྒྱུད་སྐོར། ras chung snyan brgyud skor/ 19 volumes. Krung go’i bod rig pa dpe skrun khang, 2011.

Jo nang kun mkhyen dol po pa shes rab rgyal mtshan gyi gsung 'bum-FrontCover

ཇོ་ནང་ཀུན་མཁྱེན་དོལ་པོ་པ་ཤེས་རབ་རྒྱལ་མཚན་གྱི་གསུང་འབུམ། Jo nang kun mkhyen dol po pa shes rab rgyal mtshan gyi gsung ‘bum/ 13 volumes. Krung go’i bod rig pa dpe skrun khang, 2011.

Lho brag mar pa lo tsA'i gsung 'bum-FrontCover

ལྷོ་བྲག་མར་པ་ལོ་ཙཱའི་གསུང་འབུམ། lho brag mar pa lo tsA’i gsung ‘bum/ 7 volumes. Krung go’i bod rig pa dpe skrun khang, 2011.

rje btsun mi la ras pa'i gsung 'bum-FrontCover

རྗེ་བཙུན་མི་ལ་རས་པའི་གསུང་འབུམ། rje btsun mi la ras pa’i gsung ‘bum/ 5 volumes. Krung go’i bod rig pa dpe skrun khang, 2011.

dus 'khor phyogs bsgrigs chen mo-Set

དུས་འཁོར་ཕྱོགས་བསྒྲིགས་ཆེན་མོ། dus ‘khor phyogs bsgrigs chen mo/ Twenty volumes. Bod ljongs bod yig dpe rnying dpe skrun khang, 2012.

bod kyi lo rgyus rnam thar phyogs bsgrigs-front

བོད་ཀྱི་ལོ་རྒྱུས་རྣམ་ཐར་ཕྱོགས་བསྒྲིགས། bod kyi lo rgyus rnam thar phyogs bsgrigs/ 61-90 – Thirty volumes. The third set of 30 volumes to come out so far since 2010.

Other Recent Arrivals:

rje-tsong-kha-pa-chen-po'i-gsung-'bum-ka

རྗེ་ཙོང་ཁ་པ་ཆེན་པོའི་གསུང་འབུམ། rje tsong kha pa chen po’i gsung ‘bum/ 18 volumes. Ser gtsug nang bstan dpe rnying ‘tshol bsdu phyogs sgrig khang. Krung go’i bod rig pa dpe skrun khang, 2012.

Ta po

ཏ་པོ་ – དུས་རབས་བཅུ་པ་ནས་ཉི་ཤུ་པའི་བར་གྱི་སྔ་མོའི་རྒྱ་གར་དང་བོད་ཀྱི་ལྡེབས་རིས་དང་ཡི་གེ་ནུབ་ཧི་མཱ་ལ་ཡའི་གནའ་བོའི་དགོན་གྲོང་ཞིག ཏ་པོ་དགོན་གྱི་དཔེ་མཛོད་ཁང་ནས་དཔར་བསྐྲུན་ཞུས།
TABO: An Ancient Western Himalayan Repository of age-old Indian and Tibetan Mural Paintings and Scripts dating from the tenth to the twentieth century. རྩོམ་པ་པོ། རཱ་ཧུ་ལ། rtsom pa po/ rA hu la/

ཧི་མ་ལ་ཡའི་ནང་པ་སངས་རྒྱས་པའི་ཆོས་དང་རྒྱལ་རབས་རིག་གཞུང་གི་ཞིབ་འཇུག
jo sras bkra shis tshe ring dang chab ngoms bstan pa nyi ma. 2011. Hi ma la ya’i nang pa sangs rgyas pa’i chos dang rgyal rabs rig gzhung gi zhib ‘jug: deb phreng gsum pa: pod yig nang spel pa’i dpyad rtsom khag. Proceedings of the Golden Jubilee Conference of the Namgyal Institute of Tibetology Gangtok, 2008. Gangtok: Namgyal Institute of Tibetology.

Gorampa and Shakya Chogden
གསེར་མདོག་པཎ་ཆེན་ཤཱཀྱ་མཆོག་ལྡན་གྱི་གསུང་འབུམ།
24 Volumes: gser mdog paN chen shAkya mchog ldan gyi gsung ‘bum – Shakya Chogden’s Collected Works, published in 2013 in Beijing by krun go’i bod rig pa dpe skrun khang.

ཀུན་མཁྱེན་གོ་རམས་པ་བསོད་ནམས་སེང་གེའི་གསུང་འབུམ།
15 Volumes: kun mkhyen go rams pa bsod nams seng ge’i gsung ‘bum/ rdzong sar khams bye lnga rig tub bstan slob gling nas bsgrigs – Gorampa’s Collected Works, published in 2013 in Beijing by krung go’i bod rig pa dpe skrun khang.
དམ་ཆོས་སྡུག་བསྔལ་ཞི་བྱེད་རྩ་བའི་ཆོས་སྡེ་དང་ཡན་ལག་བདུད་ཀྱི་གཅོད་ཡུལ་གྱི་གླེགས་བམ།
14 Volumes: dam chos sdug bsngal zhi byed rtsa ba’i chos sde dang yan lag bdud kyi gcod yul gyi glegs bam- Pacification of Suffering tradition of Padampa Sangye and Cutting Through practices of Machig Labdron, published in 2013 by Dingri Langkor Tsuglag Khang.

We are steadily expanding the holdings of our library here in Boulder, Colorado. Here are some of the more recent works added to our research library:New Arrivals Post May 2014-1

  • Faxian. Mémoire sur les pays bouddhiques. Les Belles Lettres, 2014.
  • Yang Xuangzhi. Mémoire sur les monastères bouddhiques de Louyang. Les Belles Lettres, 2014.
  • Akester, Matthew. 2012. The Life of Jamyang Khyentsé Wangpo by Jamgön Kongtrul. New Delhi: Shechen Publications.
  • Ramble, Charles, Peter Schwieger and Alice Travers. Tibetans who Escaped the Historian’s Net: Studies in the Social History of Tibetan Societies. Kathmandu, Nepal: Vajra Publications, 2013.
  • Chopel, Gendun. 2014. Grains of Gold: Tales of a Cosmopolitan Traveler. Translated by Thupten Jinpa and Donald S. Lopez, Jr. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.
  • Haynes, Sarah F. and Michelle J. Sorensen. Wading into the Stream of Wisdom: Essays in Honor of Leslie Kawamura. Contemporary Issues in Buddhist Studies.
  • Bengelsdorf, Hernán. Diccionario Tibetano-Castellano. Buenos Aires: Ediciones Dungkar, 2011.
  • Cranmer, Marit. Tibetan Literary Arts: Exhibition Catalog. Neilson Library, Smith College.. Shang Shung Publications, 2007.
  • Wimmel, K. William Woodville Rockhill: Scholar-Diplomat of the Tibetan Highlands. Orchid Press, 2006.
  • Lessing and Wayman. Mkhas grub rje’s Fundamentals of the Buddhist Tantras. Mouton, 1968.
  • Lopez Jr., Donald S. and Robert E. Jr. Buswell. The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2014.
  • Adelheid Herrmann-Pfandt. 2008. Die lhan kar ma : ein früher Katalog der ins Tibetische übersetzten buddhistischen Texte. Wien : Verlag der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften.

New Arrivals Post May 2014-2

  • Arslan, Saadet and Peter Schwieger. Tibetan Studies an Anthology. Beiträge zur Zentralasienforschung Vol 23. International Institute for Tibetan and Buddhist Studies (IITBS), 2010.
  • Dotson, Brandon, Kazushi Iwao and Tsuguhito Takeuchi. Scribes, Texts, and Rituals in Early Tibet and Dunhuang. Contributions to Tibetan Studies Vol 9. WiesBaden: Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag, 2013.
  • Hackett, Paul G.. A Catalogue of the Comparative Kangyur (bka’ ‘gyur dpe bsdur ma). Treasury of the Buddhist Sciences. New York: American Institute of Buddhist Studies; New York: Columbia University’s Center for Buddhist Studies, 2012.
  • Gray, David B.. The Cakrasamvara Tantra (The Discourse of Śrī Heruka): A Study and Annotated Translation. Treasury of the Buddhist Sciences. New York: American Institute of Buddhist Studies, 2007.
  • Gray, David B.. The Cakrasamvara Tantra (The Discourse of Śrī Heruka): Editions of the Sanskrit and Tibetan Texts. Treasury of the Buddhist Sciences. New York: American Institute of Buddhist Studies, 2012.
  • Balikci-Denjongpa, Anna and Alex McKay. Buddhist Himalaya: Studies in Religion, History and Culture Volume I-III: Tibetan and the Himalaya;The Sikkim Papers; The Tibetan Papers. Proceedings of the Golden Jubilee Conference of the Namgyal Institute of Tibetology Gangtok, 2008. Sikkim: Namgyal Institute of Tibetology, 2011.
  • ཏ་པོ། དུས་རབས་བཅུ་པ་ནས་ཉི་ཤུ་པའི་བར་གྱི་སྔ་མོའི་རྒྱ་གར་དང་བོད་ཀྱི་ལྡེབས་རིས་དང་ཡི་གེ། ནུབ་ཧི་མཱ་ལ་ཡའི་གནའ་བོའི་དགོན་གྲོང་ཞིག

IMG_6819

  • Les Neuf Forces de l’Homme. Samten Karmay et Philippe Sagant. Recherches sur la Haute Asie 13. Nanterre: Société d’ethnologie, 1998.
  • Les habitants du Toit du monde. Samten Karmay et Philippe Sagant. Recherches sur la Haute Asie 12. Nanterre: Société d’ethnologie, 1997.
  • Nigouma et Soukhasiddhi: Hagiographies et chants. suivi de Horizons féminins Hadewijch-Lalla-Rabi’a al-Adawiya. Traduction de Joy Vriens (Lama Tsultrim Namdak). With the support of Tsadra Foundation. La Galerie: Éditions Yogi Ling, 2014.
  • Puṣpikā: Tracing Ancient India Through Texts and Traditions. Contributions to Current Research in Indology Volume 1. Edited by Nina Mirnig, Péter-Dániel Szántó, and Michael Williams. Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2013.
  • Lambert Schmithausen. 2014. The Genesis of Yogācāra-Vijñānavāda: Responses and Reflections. Kasuga Lectures Series I. Tokyo: The International Institute for Buddhist Studies.
  • Eimer, Helmut. A Catalogue of the Kanjur fragment from Bathang Kept in the Newark Museum. Wiener Studien zur Tibetologie und Buddhismuskunde #75. Vienna: Arbeitskreis für Tibetische und Buddhistische Studien, 2012.
  • Hofer, Theresia. The Inheritance of Change: Transmission and Practice of Tibetan Medicine in Ngamring. Wiener Studien zur Tibetologie und Buddhismuskunde #76. Vienna: Arbeitskreis für Tibetische und Buddhistische Studien, 2012.
  • Weissenborn, Karen. Buchkunst Aus Nālandā: Die Aṣṭasāhasrikā Prajñāpāramitā-Handscrift in der Royal Asiatic Society/London (Ms. Hodgson 1) und ihre Stellung in der Pāla-Buchmalerei des 11./12. Jahrhunderts. Wiener Studien zur Tibetologie und Buddhismuskunde #77. Vienna: Arbeitskreis für Tibetische und Buddhistische Studien, 2012.
  • Higgins, David. The Philosophical Foundations of Classical rdzogs chen in Tibet: Investigating the Distinction Between Dualistic Mind (seems) and Primordial Knowing (ye shes). Wiener Studien zur Tibetologie und Buddhismuskunde #78. Vienna: Arbeitskreis für Tibetische und Buddhistische Studien, 2013.
  • Stuart, Daniel Malinowski. Thinking About Cessation: The Pṛṣṭhapālasūtra of the Dīrghāgama in Context. Wiener Studien zur Tibetologie und Buddhismuskunde #79. Vienna: Arbeitskreis für Tibetische und Buddhistische Studien, 2013.
  • Kuijp, Leonard W. J. van der and Arthur P. McKeown. Bcom ldan ral gri (1227-1305) On Indian Buddhist Logic and Epistemology: His Commentary on Dignāga’s Pramāṇasamuccaya. Wiener Studien zur Tibetologie und Buddhismuskunde #80. Vienna: Arbeitskreis für Tibetische und Buddhistische Studien, 2013.
  • Schneider, Johannes. Eine Buddhistische Kritik der Indischen Götter Śaṃkarasvāmins Devātiśayastotra mit Prajñāvarmans Kommentar. Nach dem tibetischen Tanjur herausgegeben und übersetzt. Wiener Studien zur Tibetologie und Buddhismuskunde #81. Vienna: Arbeitskreis für Tibetische und Buddhistische Studien, 2014.
  • Steinkellner, Ernst. The Edition of Śāntarakṣita’s Vādanyāyaṭīkā Collated With the Kundeling Manuscript. Wiener Studien zur Tibetologie und Buddhismuskunde #82. Vienna: Arbeitskreis für Tibetische und Buddhistische Studien, 2014.
  • Ernst Steinkellner. 2013. Dharmakīrtis frühe Logik – Dharmakīrti’s Early Logic: An Annotated German Translation of the Logical Parts in Pramāṇavārttika 1 andVṛtti. Volumes 1 and 2. Tokyo: The International Institute for Buddhist Studies.
  • Robert Kritzer. 2014. Garbhāvakrāntisūtra: The Sutra on Entry into the Womb. Tokyo: The International Institute for Buddhist Studies.

 

Yeh, Emily T. Taming Tibet: Landscape Transformation and the Gift of Chinese Development. Studies of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Columbia University. Ithaca & London: Cornell University Press, 2013.

Emily brings her considerable knowledge and depth of research to a range of fascinating topics that provide a truly rich picture of development in Tibet. Doctor Tsering Shakya wrote that the book “should be required reading for anyone interested in understanding contemporary Tibet and China’s relations with periphery regions” and it is clear from the start that he is correct. Filled with rich ethnographic data we find not only detailed theoretical analysis in her book, but also invaluable first person testimony. I am finding that more than anything else, reading Emily’s book is helping me to process the experiences I had in Lhasa in 2007-2008 and in the aftermath of the 2008 riots. In particular, the italicized sections that begin each chapter provide a compelling view of people and their experiences in “China’s Tibet” that I find resonate with my experience much more than many of the other writing out there. Emily provides for us a window into that world that is markedly less mottled than similar accounts. If you study Tibet, or wish to travel there, please do read this book.

 

 

2013

It has been an active year for the publication of translations. Here are some highlights from the year:
(please do add a comment if you feel something is missing)


The Light of Wisdom series from Rangjung Yeshe Publications will be complete this year with the publication of both the Great Accomplishment: Teachings on the Drubchen Ceremony (vol. 3) and Light of Wisdom: The Conclusion (vol. 5). This series is the translation of three connected texts: 1) the root text is a Padmasambhava terma, as recorded by Yeshe Tsogyal in the 8th or 9th century, and revealed by Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo and Chogyur  Lingpa in the 19th century as the Lamrin Yeshe Nyingpo (ལམ་རིམ་ཡེ་ཤེས་སྙིང་པོ་). 2) the main commentary is Jamgön Kongtrül Lodro Thaye’s (1813-1900) the Light of Wisdom, “Yeshe Nangwa” (ལམ་རིམ་ཡེ་ཤེས་སྙིང་པོའི་འགྲེལ་པ་ཡེ་ཤེས་སྣང་བ་རབ་ཏུ་རྒྱས་པ།, TBRC Text). 3) the third text is Entering the Path of Wisdom, Yeshe Lam Juk (ཡེ་ཤེས་ལམ་འཇུག), a set of annotations and notes from Jamgön Kongtrül’s student, Jamyang Drakpa, as recorded by Jokyab Rinpoche (1903-1960). Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche in turn received these teachings directly from Jokyab Rinpoche and his explanations are also included throughout the series. The first volume of the series was translated in 1993 and the final will be released on November 12th, 2013. The translation has been completed by Erik Pema Kunsang (Erik Hein Schmidt) with help from Gyurme Avertin and editing done by Marcia Schmidt and Michael Tweed.

 

 

Adam Pearcey and the Lotsawa House team continue to do their great work online: http://www.lotsawahouse.org

 

 

 

Wisdom Publications


Keith Dowman’s Eye of the Storm has been republished in a new edition by Wisdom Publications as Original Perfection: Vairotsana’s Five Early Transmissions. These are translations of 1) Rig pa’i khu byug: The Cuckoo’s Song of Gnosis 2) Rtsal chen sprugs pa: Radical Creativity 3) Khyung chen lding ba: Great Garuda in Flight 4) Rdo la gser zhun: Pure Golden Ore and 5) Mi nub pa’i rgyal mtshan: Nam mkha’ che: The Eternal Victory Banner: The Vast Space of Vajrasattva.


Cyrus Stearns published a translation of Tshar chen blo gsal rgya mtsho’s (1502-1566) Celebration of the Cuckoo (རྟོགས་བརྗོད་ལམ་གླུ་དཔྱིད་ཀྱི་རྒྱལ་མོའི་དགའ་སྟོན།, rtogs brjod lam glu dpyid kyi rgyal mo’i dga’ ston) as Song of the Road: The Poetic Travel Journal of Tsarchen Losal Gyatso with Wisdom Publications and Tsadra Foundation.

 

Mark Siderits and Shōryū Katsura published Nāgārjuna’s Middle Way.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
In 2013 Wisdom also published Yael Bentor’s A Classical Tibetan Reader.

 

 

 

 

 

 

top

UMA Institute


Jeffrey Hopkins’ team at the UMA Institute for Tibetan Studies have been hard at work at a set of translations, many of which are available online here. Recent publications that are available now include:

Principles for Practice: Jam-yang-shay-pa on the Four Reliances with Ngag-wang-pal-dan’s Annotations, 120 pages, translated by William Magee.

The Hidden Teaching of the Perfection of Wisdom Sutras: Jam-yang-shay-pa’s Seventy Topics and Kon-chog-jig-may-wang-po’s Supplement, 750 pages,  translated by Jeffrey Hopkins and Jongbok Yi, and edited by Elizabeth Napper.

 

Shambhala Publications

The Epic of Gesar of Ling was translated by Robin Kornman, Lama Chonam, and Sangye Khandro and published in a beautiful edition by Shambhala Publications (680 pages, 9781590308424)

This year, Snow Lion, now an imprint of Shambhala Publications, printed several previously published works along with new translations. Heidi Köppl‘s Establishing Appearances as Divine and Glen Mullin‘s From the Heart of Chenrezig: The Dalai Lamas on Tantra are both worth mentioning here. As you can see below, they also generously published a number of books in the Tsadra Foundation Series.

Also in 2013, Judy Lief’s three volumes of Trungpa teachings titled The Profound Treasury of the Ocean of Dharma was published in a beautiful set by Shambhala Publications.

 

 

Dharmachakra Translation Committee completed Distinguishing Phenomena from Their Intrinsic Nature Maitreya’s Dharmadharmatāvibhaṅga (ཆོས་དང་ཆོས་ཉིད་རྣམ་པར་འབྱེད་པ།, chos dang chos nyid rnam par ‘byed pa, TBRC Text) with Commentaries by Khenpo Shenga (TBRC Text) and Ju Mipham (TBRC Text).


Wulstan Fletcher and Helena Blankeleder of the Padmakara Translation Group have finished the second and concluding volume of the Treasury of Precious Qualities, translated from Jigme Lingpa‘s Tibetan text the Yönten Dzö (ཡོན་ཏན་རིན་པོ་ཆེའི་མཛོད།, TBRC Text) with Kangyur Rinpoche‘s commentary.

 

 
 

 

top

Columbia University Press


Andrew Quintman‘s The Yogin & the Madman: Reading the Biographical Corpus of Tibet’s Great Saint Milarepa in the South Asia Across Disciplines series from Columbia University Press. Although not primarily a translation, this is worth mentioning here and includes translations with Tibetan transcription in the appendices.

Special mention should be made of the Sources of Tibetan Tradition, from Columbia University Press, edited by Kurtis R. Schaeffer, Matthew T. Kapstein, and Gray Tuttle. This text will certainly become an essential resource for students of the Tibetan traditions. Mr. Schaeffer and Mr. Tuttle have been particularly busy, as they also published A Tibetan History Reader, which “reproduces essential, hard-to-find essays from the past fifty years of Tibetan studies, along with several new contributions.”

And in other news for 2013, Christian Wedemeyer‘s Making Sense of Tantric Buddhism: History, Semiology, and Transgression in the Indian Traditions received the 2013 American Academy of Religion Award for Excellence in the Study of Religion (Historical Studies).

Speaking of Columbia, Bob Thurman and Tom Yarnall’s team at AIBS have been busy with several new publications:

AIBS

Tom Yarnall’s translation of chapters 11 and 12 of Tsong Khapa’s སྔགས་རིམ་ཆེན་མོ། (sngags rim chen mo) is now available as Great Treatise on the Stages of Mantra, which was published as a part of the rjey yab sras gsung ‘bum series, which is a sub-series of the Treasury of Buddhist Sciences series from the American Institute of Buddhist Studies.

As a follow up to his 2007 publication of The Cakrasamvara Tantra, David Gray published editions of the Sanskrit and Tibetan texts in the Treasury of Buddhist Sciences series from the American Institute of Buddhist Studies. The volume “includes an introductory essay on the textual history of the Cakrasamvara Tantra, a critical edition of the Sanskrit text, based upon available manuscripts, commentaries, and intertexts in the Buddhist explanatory tantras; a critical edition of the standard Prajñākīrti-Mardo revised Tibetan translation, based upon seven print redactions; a diplomatic edition of the Sumatikīrti-Malgyo revised translation, as preserved in the Phug-brag manuscript Kangyur; and an edition of the extracanonical Sumatikīrti-Mardo translation, based upon two surviving prints.”

 

Paul Hackett‘s A Catalogue of the Comparative Kangyur (bka’ ‘gyur dpe bsdur ma) was published in the AIBS series as well, with the second title on the Tengyur coming soon.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
top

Tsadra Foundation

Having completed the ten volume Treasury of Knowledge (ཤེས་བྱ་མཛོད།) translation in 2012, an interactive digital edition was launched for the iPad this year, available at the Apple Store (an Android version is coming!)

In 2013 Richard Barron (Chokyi Nyima) translated Jamgön Kongtrül’s dkar chag from the གདམས་ངག་རིན་པོ་ཆེའི་མཛོད། (gdams ngag rin po che’i mdzod). Mr. Barron continues to work on volumes one and two (gsang sngags rnying ma) of the eighteen volume collection, while Sarah Harding works on volumes thirteen and fourteen on ཞི་བྱེད་ and བཅོད་ (zhi byed dang gcod).

Karl Brunnhölzl, who appears to be constantly finishing translations, had Mining for Wisdom Within Delusion come out in January from Snow Lion/Shambhala Publications. Along with the text attributed to Maitreya and Asanga, the Dharmadharmatāvibhaṅga, this publication includes Vasubandhu’s Dharmadharmatāvibhaṅgavṛtti, Ranjung Dorje’s commentary ཆོས་དང་ཆོས་ཉིད་རྣམ་པར་འབྱེད་པའི་བསྟན་བཅོས་ཀྱི་རྣམ་པར་བཤད་པའི་རྒྱན། (chos dang chos nyid rnam par ‘byed pa’i bstan bcos kyi rnam par bshad pa’i rgyan, TBRC Text), and Gö Lotsāwa’s commentary ཐེག་པ་ཆེན་པོ་རྒྱུད་བླ་མའི་བསྟན་བཅོས་ཀྱི་འགྲེལ་བཤད་དེ་ཁོ་ན་ཉིད་རབ་ཏུ་གསལ་བའི་མེ་ལོང། (theg pa chen po rgyud bla ma’i bstan bcos kyi ‘grel bshad de kho na nyid rab tu gsal ba’i me long, TBRC Text), as well as excerpts from all other available commentaries on Maitreya’s text.

 

A new version of bu ston rin chen grub’s (1290-1364) བདེ་བར་གཤེགས་པའི་བསྟན་པའི་གསལ་བྱེད་ཆོས་ཀྱི་འབྱུང་གནས་གསུང་རབ་རིན་པོ་ཆེའི་མཛོད། (bde bar gshegs pa’i bstan pa’i gsal byed chos kyi ‘byung gnas gsung rab rin po che’i mdzod, TBRC Text) was translated by Lisa Stein and Ngawang Zangpo (Hugh Thompson) as Butön’s History of Buddhism in India and Its Spread to Tibet with Snow Lion/Shambhala Publications in the Tsadra Foundation Series.


Sarah Harding updated her classic work Machik’s Complete Explanation (an expanded edition in the Tsadra Foundation Series) with added texts on chod from Ranjung Dorje, གཅོད་བཀའ་ཚོམས་ཆེན་མོའི་ས་བཅད། (gcod bka’ tshoms chen mo’i sa bcad) and གཅོད་ཀྱི་ཊཱིཀཱ་ (gcod kyi ṭīkā).


 

In France, Christian Charrier finished the first volume of Au coeur du ciel, Le système de la Voie médiane dans la tradition kagyu by Karl Brunnhölzl (traduit de l’anglais The Center of the Sunlit Sky: Madhyamaka in the Kagyu Tradition).

 

 

 

top

ALSO IN 2013

 

 

José Cabezón published a translation of Rog bande shes rab’s (166-1244) detailed presentation of the “nine vehicles” from the 13th century text གྲུབ་མཐའ་སོ་སོའི་བཞེད་ཚུལ་གཞུང་གསལ་བར་སྟོན་པ་ཆོས་འབྱུང་གྲུབ་མཐའ་ཆེན་པོ་བསྟན་པའི་སྒྲོན་མེ། (grub mtha’ so so’i bzhed tshul gzhung gsal bar ston pa chos ‘byung grub mtha’ chen po bstan pa’i sgron meTBRC Text) in The Buddha’s Doctrine and the Nine Vehicles: Rog Bande Sherab’s Lamp of the Teachings with Oxford University Press (320 pages, 978-0-19-995862-7).

 

 

 

 

More translations were also published in 2013 by the Padma Karpo Translation Committee. Recent publications from PKTC include Maitreya’s Sutras and Prayer With Commentary by Padma Karpo, translated by Tony Duff and Tamas Agocs, and A Bitwise Commentary on Entering the Conduct “A Lamp for the Path of the Middle Way by Drukchen Padma Karpo, translated by Tony Duff. And kindle versions of Five-Part Mahamudra by Padma Karpo and Five-Part Mahamudra by Situ Chokyi Jungnay are available on Amazon.

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

Elio Guarisco and Nancy Simmons produced a translation of Karma gling pa’s བར་དོ་ཐོས་གྲོལ། (bar do thos grol TBRC Text) in The Tibetan Book of the Dead: Awakening Upon Dying published with North Atlantic Books and Shang Shung Publications.

Donatella Rossi translated and edited A History of Zhang Zhung and Tibet, Volume One: The Early Period (264 pages, 978-1583946107) by Chogyal Namkhai Norbu. Published by North Atlantic Books.

The second volume is apparently available as The Light of Kailash from the Shang Shung Institute.

 

 

 

 

 



Martin J. Boord has updated, revised and expanded his The Cult of the Diety of Vajrakīla into this year’s  Gathering the Elements: The Cult of the Wrathful Deity Vajrakila According to the Texts of the Northern Treasures Tradition of Tibet (410 pages, 978-3-942380-10-2). Published by Edition Khordong at Wandel Verlag.

 
 
 

 
 

 

 

Also in 2013, Brill’s Tibetan Studies Library added two more to the series:

Tibetan Inscriptions (9789004250697)
Proceedings of a Panel Held at the Twelfth Seminar of the International Association for Tibetan Studies, Vancouver 2010
Edited by Kurt Tropper, University of Vienna and Cristina Scherrer-Schaub, University of Lausanne/École Pratique des Hautes Études, Paris

Monastic and Lay Traditions in North-Eastern Tibet (9789004255692)
Edited by Yangdon Dhondup, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, Ulrich Pagel School of Oriental and African Studies, London, and Geoffrey Samuel, Cardiff University

 

 

 

 

Brandon Dotson, Kazushi Iwao, and Tsuguhito Takeuchi produced an edited volume from the 2010 IATS in Vancouver, Scribes, Texts, and Rituals in Early Tibet and Dunhuang with Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag. Although not a translation per se, it gets an honorable mention for being the first (I believe) publication of collected essays from the 2010 meeting of the International Association of Tibetan Studies.
 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Harvard Oriental Series Volume 75 was published in 2013: The Foundation for Yoga Practitioners: The Buddhist Yogācārabhūmi Treatise and Its Adaptation in India, East Asia, and Tibet. This collection of essays was edited by Ulrich Timme Kragh and includes essays on the background and environment of the Yogācārabhūmi, the text and key sections therein, and a section each on Indian, East Asian, and Tibetan receptions to the text. The Tibetan section includes essays by Dorji Wangchuk, Orna Almogi, Ulrich Kragh, and Leonard van der Kuijp.

 

 

 

back to top

COMING SOON

●    The Profound Inner Principles by Karmapa Rangjung Dorje, with commentary by Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Taye, translated by Elizabeth Callahan

●    Refining Our Perception of Reality, by Sera Kandro, translated by Ngawang Zangpo

●    The Wondrous Dance of Illusion: The Autobiography of Khenpo Ngawang Palzang, translated by Heidi Nevin and Jacob Leschly

●    When Clouds Part, Uttaratantrashastra, with commentary by Tashi Ozer, translated by Karl Brunnhölzl

●    Au coeur du ciel, Le système de la Voie médiane dans la tradition kagyu, vol 2, traduit de l’anglais par Christian Charrier

●    Naked Seeing: The Great Perfection, the Wheel of Time, and Visionary Buddhism in Renaissance Tibet by Christopher Hatchell of Coe College. 464 pages, expected in December 2013, published by Oxford University Press.
“This superb study brings to light some of the most esoteric and innovative contemplative practices ever to emerge within Asian religions. In clear and engaging terms, Hatchell explores how the visionary techniques of the Kalacakra and Great Perfection traditions work to undo our deeply engrained psychophysical habits and open us to new ways of seeing. The result is a study that will appeal not only to scholars and practitioners of Tibetan Buddhism, but to anyone interested in the phenomenology of sensory perception.” —Jacob P. Dalton, UC Berkeley

●    Colloquial Tibetan by Jonathan Samuels presents contemporary Lhasa Tibetan for beginners and includes CDs.

Oct 26, 2012

Dear friends,

We are delighted to announce that the final volume of the ten-volume Treasury of Knowledge Series has now been published. This brings to completion a project begun by the previous Kyabje Kalu Rinpoche and his students over 25 years ago, and is – to quote Roger Jackson in his article to appear in Buddhadharma – “a signal event in the transmission of Buddhism to the West”.

We would like to take a moment to acknowledge not only the translators who completed this work, but also the great number of individuals who participated in the early translation efforts in Bodhgaya and Sonada, India, in the early years, the many Rinpoches and Khenpos who offered their encouragement and assistance throughout the translation process, and those who offered sponsorship in first difficult years.

Tsadra Foundation was established in 2000 and very quickly decided this was a project worthy of its support. Collaborating with Bokar Tulku Rinpoche (who had taken over responsibility for the project from the previous Kalu Rinpoche) and with Snow Lion Publications we were able to provide stable financial and logistical support to move the project ahead.

Today we see the fruit of all these years of effort, dedication and commitment. We invite you all to take a moment and join us in celebrating this extraordinary accomplishment. Attached below you will find Roger Jackson’s full article that will appear in the Winter 2012 Edition of Buddhadharma: The Buddhist Practitioner’s Quarterly.

Sincerely,

Eric Colombel

and the Directors of Tsadra Foundation

Treasury of Knowledge Review by Roger Jackson

 

 

 

 

The Review article by Roger Jackson

from Buddhadharma: The Buddhist Practitioner’s Quarterly, Winter 2012 edition.

“Perceiving Reality is a masterful study of Buddhist epistemology.
It is first and foremost a substantial contribution to the philosophical
literature, developing a compelling account of epistemic authority in the
context of the phenomenology of perception. It is also an excellent study of
Indian Buddhist epistemological inquiry. The philology is impeccable.
But it is always in the service of philosophy.
Philosophers and Buddhologists must pay attention to Coseru’s book.”
–Jay Garfield

What turns the continuous flow of experience into perceptually distinct objects?
Can our verbal descriptions unambiguously capture what it is like to see, hear, or feel?
How might we reason about the testimony that perception alone discloses?
Christian Coseru proposes a rigorous and highly original way to answer these questions
by developing a framework for understanding perception as a mode of apprehension that
is intentionally constituted, pragmatically oriented, and causally effective. By engaging
with recent discussions in phenomenology and analytic philosophy of mind, but also by
drawing on the work of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty, Coseru offers a sustained argument
that Buddhist philosophers, in particular those who follow the tradition of inquiry
initiated by Dignāga and Dharmakīrti, have much to offer when it comes to explaining
why epistemological disputes about the evidential role of perceptual experience cannot
satisfactorily be resolved without taking into account the structure of our cognitive
awareness. Perceiving Reality examines the function of perception and its relation
to attention, language, and discursive thought, and provides new ways of conceptualizing
the Buddhist defense of the reflexivity thesis of consciousness–
namely, that each cognitive event is to be understood as involving a pre-reflective implicit
awareness of its own occurrence.
Coseru advances an innovative approach to Buddhist philosophy of mind in the form of
phenomenological naturalism, and moves beyond comparative approaches to philosophy
by emphasizing the continuity of concerns between Buddhist and Western philosophical
accounts of the nature of perceptual content and the character of perceptual consciousness.

 

Dr. Stefan Larsson’s dissertation has been published as volume 30 of Brill’s Tibetan Studies Library.

Crazy for Wisdom

The Making of a Mad Yogin in Fifteenth-Century Tibet

The book looks at the life of a young monk from the 15th-century named Sangyé Gyaltsen who became the famous “Madman of Tsang” and the eventual author of the Life of Milarepa. Read more about this book on Brill’s homepage.

ཐོ་ལིང་

Although a complete list of the books we have in our new Research Center in Boulder might be useful, I think readers will find it much more interesting if I regularly make note of a useful, strange, beautiful, or rare book found in our library. This week I would like to bring to your attention Roberto Vitali’s book, Records of Tho.Ling. By no means a rare book (you can find it on Amazon), it is expensive and perhaps for good reason.

Records of Tho.ling Front Cover

A nice grey cover reminiscent of the earth around Tholing Monastery.

Records of Tho.Ling was published in 1999 and is A Literary and Visual Reconstruction of the “Mother” Monastery in Gu.ge with monumental reconstruction and mapping of Tho.ling and branch monasteries by Bianca Visconti and Christophe Besuchet. It includes stunning visual work, line drawings, designs and paintings by Laura Boutwell, Robert Powell, Mukti Singh Thapa, and Bianca Visconti. Robert Powell’s excellent painting of the view of Tho.ling from the entrance is most notable, along with the Viscontis’ line drawings, designs and sketches. The book was published by High Asia, an imprint of Amnye Machen, an institute devoted to the systematic and scientific study of Tibetan history, culture, society and politics.

There are several things to love about this book, but what I must mention above all is the design. I love footnotes, in all shapes and sizes, but having a wide margin with smaller type footnotes on the left and right sides? Brilliant! It lets the text flow as normal through full pages, but allows for relevant scholarly information and references to be found on the page while reading instead of having to stop and check the back of the book. Of course, it is rarely practical to print a book 21.27cm X 29.85cm in size. The fonts used and the weight of the paper together with the beautiful drawings and diagrams reminds me of the wonder and fascination I experienced in libraries when I was young and first discovering the beauty of books.

Although I mention the art and design first, the book is not another “art of Tibet” volume. It includes a detailed literary reconstruction of Toling monastery with translations of relevant historical texts, notes, bibliography, an index, and appendixes. In the first part of the book, the monastery of Toling and the process of it’s creation is discussed along with a presentation of phases of Toling’s history from the 10th century on up to the 19th century. In the second part there is a kind of reconstruction of the temple complex at Toling along with studies of its organization and the historical implications of it’s monuments. The appendixes contain a number of interesting things, including a printing of the relevant documents used in the book in Tibetan script.

Toling, (ཐོ་ལིང་), which is apparently also pronounced Toding (མཐོ་ལྡིང་), was an important religious institution in western Tibet for a thousand years. It is sometimes claimed to have been founded by the great Tibetan translator Rinchen Zangpo (རིན་ཆེན་བཟང་པོ་), but the sources Vitali quotes indicate that it was King Yeshe Ö or the both of them together. Rinchen Zangpo “frequented” one of the temples in Toling and according to the stories had a residence there. Atīśa ( ཇོ་བོ་རྗེ་) also graced the spot with his presence, which sources say is the site where the two, Pandita and Lotsawa, had their first meeting (The Blue Annals, etc.). According to Vitali, the only known early text to clearly date the founding of Toling is the Ngari Gyalrab (མངའ་རིས་རྒྱལ་རབས་), in which it says that Toling was founded by the king Yeshe Ö ( ཡེ་ཤེས་འོད་) in 996 (“མེ་ཕོ་སྤྲེའུའི་ལོ་ལ་གུ་གེར་ཐོ་ལིང་གི་གཙུག་ལག་ཁང་གི་རྨངས་བྲིས་”; p.53, lines 7-8, Vitali page 20 and 193). This, together with evidence of the inscription at Tapo (ཏ་པོ་) that says it was founded at the same time as two other monasteries known to be founded in 996 allows for the dating to be more certain. The original temple complex seems to have consisted of four major temples around one central building with eight smaller structures near them, creating the mandalic structure of the complex. King Yeshe Ö was famous for his governance strategies and was a major patron of Buddhism in western Tibet. He ordered the local farmers to provide for the 80 monks that made up the first sangha at Toling, which was one of the key acts of patronage that allowed it to grow into the most important religious seat in the kingdom of Gugé (page 21).

Because of the choice of transliteration scheme used throughout the main body of Vitali’s text, it really can’t be read meaningfully by a nonspecialist, but it is quite obviously not written for muggles. The text is filled with details about the theocratic organization of the kingdom and citations of government documents from old Tibet, which is wonderful. However, many of the sentences that are “translations” are in fact so full of transliterated terms with periods between the syllables that one might as well just read the Tibetan. In fact, some sentences are utterly illegible for someone who does not know Wylie and Tibetan. But I’d rather not dwell on the negatives: Sometimes it is not within the author’s power to make sure the Tibetan is included in a translation or academic work, so I applaud the use of Tibetan script in the appendices and I’m glad the publisher and printer were able to handle it. The book was printed in Italy by MARIOGROS of Torino, now part of AGIT, worth noting merely because the paper and style are excellent. The table of contents is recreated below so you can see some of the detail of the work presented there.

For more on Gugé and Toling, you can find a number of blogs and personal websites with pictures and descriptions, but take a look at some of these photos of the Gu ge Kingdom here and here you will find an interesting travel journal.

Our library also holds two other of Vitali’s excellent books: The Kingdoms of Gu.ge Pu.hrang: According to mNga’.ris rgyal.rabs by Gu.ge mkhan.chen Ngag.dbang grags pa, 1996; and  The Earth Ox Papers: Proceedings of the International Seminar on Tibetan and Himalayan Studies, Held at the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives, September 2009.

The List of Contents from Records of Tho.ling:

Preface 1

Part One
The temples of Tho.ling. An annotated reminder of historical events concerning them 7
A description of Gu.ge, the land of Tho.ling 9
Valleys of Gu.ge 11
Synopsis 13
The Genealogy of the kings of Gu.ge 13
Building phases at Tho.ling 14
Building phases at each of the main Tho.ling temples 14
Documented images and structures put up at Tho.ling
from its foundation to the end of bstan.pa phyi.dar 15
Building phases of the Gu.ge temples 16

Section One
Historical phases at Tho.ling. A summary of the literary material
(10th-11th centuries) 19
The foundation 19
Antecedents: Tho.ling before the foundation of its temple 21
An episode occuring at Tho.ling during bstan.pa phyi.dar 21
The completion of Tho.ling gtsug.lag.khang in 1028 22
The protrectress of Tho.ling 24
The 1037 sack of Tho.ling 24
Byang.chub.’od’s contributions to Tho.ling 25
Tho.ling and Jo.bo.rje 27
Tho.ling gSer.khang 28
The Shing.sgra hill and its monuments 31
Zhi.ba.’ods endowments to Tho.ling gtsug.lag.khang 31
The Tho.ling chos.’khor 32
The period of obscurantism in Gu.ge and particularly at Tho.ling 32
Tho.ling from the late 12th to the late 13th century, the period in sTod
dominated by the bKa’.brgyud.pa-s 34
The restoration ofTho.ling by the Gu.ge king Grags.pa.lde 35
The second great phase ofTho.ling (15th century) 37

Section Two
Further annotated reminders of events in the history of Tho.ling
(16th-19th centuries) 43
Tho.ling during the time of Shanti.pa Blo.gros rgyal.mtshan (16th century) 43
Tho.ling in the 17th century: the La.dwags-Gu.ge war and the advent
of dGa’.ldan pho.brang 46
The La.dwags.pa period ofTho.ling 47
Tho.ling as the secular seat of Gu.ge.pa power: a summary 49
The dGa’.ldan pho.brang period 50
The lineage of the early dGe.lugs.pa abbots of Tho.ling 50
Tho.ling during the regency of sde.srid Sangs.rgyas rgya.mtsho 51
Tho.ling under the dGa .ldan pho.brang after
sde.srid Sangs.rgyas rgya.mtsho 54
The end of the royal lineage of Gu.ge 54
Tho.ling in the period after the end of the Gu.ge dynasty 55
Tho.ling during the 19th century 56

Part Two
A study of the buildings composing the Tho.ling complex

Introduction: the inventories of the Tho.ling receptacles of body,
speech and mind 59

Section One
English translation of the significant parts of the rten.deb 65
List of contents 65
‘du.khang ‘Dzam.gling.brgyan 66
brGya.rtsa lho.brgyud 68
Statues in medicinal clay in brGya.rtsa lho.brgyud 70
brGya.rtsa byang.ma 71
Statues in medicinal clay in brGya.rtsa byang.ma 73
Mani lha.khang 74
rGyal.khang 74
Bla.brang mgon.khang 75
mKhan.po rin.po.che’i gzims.chung 75
lha.khang ‘Jig-rten.brgyan 76
‘Bri.zur dge.slong bZang.po’i mchod.khang 76
Byams.khang 76
gSer.khang 76

Section Two
Critical considerations concerning textual evidence 77

Section Three
A classification of the Tho.ling temples based on both textual
and oral evidence 83
dPal.dpe.med lhun.gyis grub.pa’i gtsug.lag.khang 84
brGya.rtsa lho.brgyud 84
brGya.rtsa byang.ma 87
Temples outside the gtsug.lag.khang 88

Section Four
Final reconstruction of the temple complex (being a plan in words) 95
Religious and lay edifices of Tho.ling 95
The religious buildings 95
mChod.rten-s 98
The lay edifices 102
In the surroundings of Tho.ling 103

Section Five
A study of the organization of Tho.ling 109
The branch monasteries ofTho.ling 109
The hierarchy ofTho.ling 114
The annual ceremonies held at Tho.ling 115

Section Six
Historical implications arising from the monuments of Tho.ling 119
Tho.ling gtsug.lag.khang (i.e. the structure founded in 996) 119
dPal.dpe.med lhun.gyis grub.pa’i gtsug.lag.khang
(i.e. the same structure completed in 1028) 122
gSung.chos ra.ba 128
gNas.bcu lha.khang 128
‘Du.khang ‘Dzam.gling.brgyan 129
gSer.khang 129
The plain of Tho.ling 132

Appendixes

Appendix One
Records of Mang.nang: a brief attempt at a literary and visual
recontruction of its temples 135
Mang.nang sprod.deb 138

Appendix Two
Records of mDa’.ba.rdzong: a brief attempt at a reconstruction
of its temples based on literary and oral evidence 141
Religious buildings 145
Lay buildings 146

Appendix Three
A document being a synopsis of the Tho.ling rten.deb 147

Appendix Four
Tho.ling gNas.bcu lha.khang sprod.deb 149

Appendix Five
Temples in Gu.ge, Pu.hrang, sGar.rdzong, Ru.thog, dGe.rgyas,
sGer.rtse and mTsho.chen 151

Appendix Six
Tibetan text of the documents relevant to the reconstruction of Tho.ling 155
Tho.ling rten.deb 155
Tho.ling gNas.bcu lha.khang sprod.deb 176
Mang.nang sprod.deb 178

Appendix Seven
A few edicts concerning Tho.ling issued during the late period
of the Gu.ge dynasty and afterwards 181
The 1653 edict of the La.dwags king Indra.bo.dhi
to the people of Gu.ge 181
The edict of fire dragon (1736)
issued by the 7th Dalai Lama bsKal.bzang rgya.mtsho 182
The edict of earth horse (1738) 186
The bka’.shog issued by gNod.sbyin phun.tshogs in fire sheep 1847 186

Appendix Eight
Tibetan text of the passages translated in the present work
(documents other than those published in Appendix Six and Seven) 191

Bibliography
Primary sources 211
Secondary sources 216

Index 219

 

Archives