2013

It has been an active year for the publication of translations. Here are some highlights from the year:
(please do add a comment if you feel something is missing)


The Light of Wisdom series from Rangjung Yeshe Publications will be complete this year with the publication of both the Great Accomplishment: Teachings on the Drubchen Ceremony (vol. 3) and Light of Wisdom: The Conclusion (vol. 5). This series is the translation of three connected texts: 1) the root text is a Padmasambhava terma, as recorded by Yeshe Tsogyal in the 8th or 9th century, and revealed by Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo and Chogyur  Lingpa in the 19th century as the Lamrin Yeshe Nyingpo (ལམ་རིམ་ཡེ་ཤེས་སྙིང་པོ་). 2) the main commentary is Jamgön Kongtrül Lodro Thaye’s (1813-1900) the Light of Wisdom, “Yeshe Nangwa” (ལམ་རིམ་ཡེ་ཤེས་སྙིང་པོའི་འགྲེལ་པ་ཡེ་ཤེས་སྣང་བ་རབ་ཏུ་རྒྱས་པ།, TBRC Text). 3) the third text is Entering the Path of Wisdom, Yeshe Lam Juk (ཡེ་ཤེས་ལམ་འཇུག), a set of annotations and notes from Jamgön Kongtrül’s student, Jamyang Drakpa, as recorded by Jokyab Rinpoche (1903-1960). Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche in turn received these teachings directly from Jokyab Rinpoche and his explanations are also included throughout the series. The first volume of the series was translated in 1993 and the final will be released on November 12th, 2013. The translation has been completed by Erik Pema Kunsang (Erik Hein Schmidt) with help from Gyurme Avertin and editing done by Marcia Schmidt and Michael Tweed.

 

 

Adam Pearcey and the Lotsawa House team continue to do their great work online: http://www.lotsawahouse.org

 

 

 

Wisdom Publications


Keith Dowman’s Eye of the Storm has been republished in a new edition by Wisdom Publications as Original Perfection: Vairotsana’s Five Early Transmissions. These are translations of 1) Rig pa’i khu byug: The Cuckoo’s Song of Gnosis 2) Rtsal chen sprugs pa: Radical Creativity 3) Khyung chen lding ba: Great Garuda in Flight 4) Rdo la gser zhun: Pure Golden Ore and 5) Mi nub pa’i rgyal mtshan: Nam mkha’ che: The Eternal Victory Banner: The Vast Space of Vajrasattva.


Cyrus Stearns published a translation of Tshar chen blo gsal rgya mtsho’s (1502-1566) Celebration of the Cuckoo (རྟོགས་བརྗོད་ལམ་གླུ་དཔྱིད་ཀྱི་རྒྱལ་མོའི་དགའ་སྟོན།, rtogs brjod lam glu dpyid kyi rgyal mo’i dga’ ston) as Song of the Road: The Poetic Travel Journal of Tsarchen Losal Gyatso with Wisdom Publications and Tsadra Foundation.

 

Mark Siderits and Shōryū Katsura published Nāgārjuna’s Middle Way.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
In 2013 Wisdom also published Yael Bentor’s A Classical Tibetan Reader.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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UMA Institute


Jeffrey Hopkins’ team at the UMA Institute for Tibetan Studies have been hard at work at a set of translations, many of which are available online here. Recent publications that are available now include:

Principles for Practice: Jam-yang-shay-pa on the Four Reliances with Ngag-wang-pal-dan’s Annotations, 120 pages, translated by William Magee.

The Hidden Teaching of the Perfection of Wisdom Sutras: Jam-yang-shay-pa’s Seventy Topics and Kon-chog-jig-may-wang-po’s Supplement, 750 pages,  translated by Jeffrey Hopkins and Jongbok Yi, and edited by Elizabeth Napper.

 

Shambhala Publications

The Epic of Gesar of Ling was translated by Robin Kornman, Lama Chonam, and Sangye Khandro and published in a beautiful edition by Shambhala Publications (680 pages, 9781590308424)

This year, Snow Lion, now an imprint of Shambhala Publications, printed several previously published works along with new translations. Heidi Köppl‘s Establishing Appearances as Divine and Glen Mullin‘s From the Heart of Chenrezig: The Dalai Lamas on Tantra are both worth mentioning here. As you can see below, they also generously published a number of books in the Tsadra Foundation Series.

Also in 2013, Judy Lief’s three volumes of Trungpa teachings titled The Profound Treasury of the Ocean of Dharma was published in a beautiful set by Shambhala Publications.

 

 

Dharmachakra Translation Committee completed Distinguishing Phenomena from Their Intrinsic Nature Maitreya’s Dharmadharmatāvibhaṅga (ཆོས་དང་ཆོས་ཉིད་རྣམ་པར་འབྱེད་པ།, chos dang chos nyid rnam par ‘byed pa, TBRC Text) with Commentaries by Khenpo Shenga (TBRC Text) and Ju Mipham (TBRC Text).


Wulstan Fletcher and Helena Blankeleder of the Padmakara Translation Group have finished the second and concluding volume of the Treasury of Precious Qualities, translated from Jigme Lingpa‘s Tibetan text the Yönten Dzö (ཡོན་ཏན་རིན་པོ་ཆེའི་མཛོད།, TBRC Text) with Kangyur Rinpoche‘s commentary.

 

 
 

 

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Columbia University Press


Andrew Quintman‘s The Yogin & the Madman: Reading the Biographical Corpus of Tibet’s Great Saint Milarepa in the South Asia Across Disciplines series from Columbia University Press. Although not primarily a translation, this is worth mentioning here and includes translations with Tibetan transcription in the appendices.

Special mention should be made of the Sources of Tibetan Tradition, from Columbia University Press, edited by Kurtis R. Schaeffer, Matthew T. Kapstein, and Gray Tuttle. This text will certainly become an essential resource for students of the Tibetan traditions. Mr. Schaeffer and Mr. Tuttle have been particularly busy, as they also published A Tibetan History Reader, which “reproduces essential, hard-to-find essays from the past fifty years of Tibetan studies, along with several new contributions.”

And in other news for 2013, Christian Wedemeyer‘s Making Sense of Tantric Buddhism: History, Semiology, and Transgression in the Indian Traditions received the 2013 American Academy of Religion Award for Excellence in the Study of Religion (Historical Studies).

Speaking of Columbia, Bob Thurman and Tom Yarnall’s team at AIBS have been busy with several new publications:

AIBS

Tom Yarnall’s translation of chapters 11 and 12 of Tsong Khapa’s སྔགས་རིམ་ཆེན་མོ། (sngags rim chen mo) is now available as Great Treatise on the Stages of Mantra, which was published as a part of the rjey yab sras gsung ‘bum series, which is a sub-series of the Treasury of Buddhist Sciences series from the American Institute of Buddhist Studies.

As a follow up to his 2007 publication of The Cakrasamvara Tantra, David Gray published editions of the Sanskrit and Tibetan texts in the Treasury of Buddhist Sciences series from the American Institute of Buddhist Studies. The volume “includes an introductory essay on the textual history of the Cakrasamvara Tantra, a critical edition of the Sanskrit text, based upon available manuscripts, commentaries, and intertexts in the Buddhist explanatory tantras; a critical edition of the standard Prajñākīrti-Mardo revised Tibetan translation, based upon seven print redactions; a diplomatic edition of the Sumatikīrti-Malgyo revised translation, as preserved in the Phug-brag manuscript Kangyur; and an edition of the extracanonical Sumatikīrti-Mardo translation, based upon two surviving prints.”

 

Paul Hackett‘s A Catalogue of the Comparative Kangyur (bka’ ‘gyur dpe bsdur ma) was published in the AIBS series as well, with the second title on the Tengyur coming soon.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
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Tsadra Foundation

Having completed the ten volume Treasury of Knowledge (ཤེས་བྱ་མཛོད།) translation in 2012, an interactive digital edition was launched for the iPad this year, available at the Apple Store (an Android version is coming!)

In 2013 Richard Barron (Chokyi Nyima) translated Jamgön Kongtrül’s dkar chag from the གདམས་ངག་རིན་པོ་ཆེའི་མཛོད། (gdams ngag rin po che’i mdzod). Mr. Barron continues to work on volumes one and two (gsang sngags rnying ma) of the eighteen volume collection, while Sarah Harding works on volumes thirteen and fourteen on ཞི་བྱེད་ and བཅོད་ (zhi byed dang gcod).

Karl Brunnhölzl, who appears to be constantly finishing translations, had Mining for Wisdom Within Delusion come out in January from Snow Lion/Shambhala Publications. Along with the text attributed to Maitreya and Asanga, the Dharmadharmatāvibhaṅga, this publication includes Vasubandhu’s Dharmadharmatāvibhaṅgavṛtti, Ranjung Dorje’s commentary ཆོས་དང་ཆོས་ཉིད་རྣམ་པར་འབྱེད་པའི་བསྟན་བཅོས་ཀྱི་རྣམ་པར་བཤད་པའི་རྒྱན། (chos dang chos nyid rnam par ‘byed pa’i bstan bcos kyi rnam par bshad pa’i rgyan, TBRC Text), and Gö Lotsāwa’s commentary ཐེག་པ་ཆེན་པོ་རྒྱུད་བླ་མའི་བསྟན་བཅོས་ཀྱི་འགྲེལ་བཤད་དེ་ཁོ་ན་ཉིད་རབ་ཏུ་གསལ་བའི་མེ་ལོང། (theg pa chen po rgyud bla ma’i bstan bcos kyi ‘grel bshad de kho na nyid rab tu gsal ba’i me long, TBRC Text), as well as excerpts from all other available commentaries on Maitreya’s text.

 

A new version of bu ston rin chen grub’s (1290-1364) བདེ་བར་གཤེགས་པའི་བསྟན་པའི་གསལ་བྱེད་ཆོས་ཀྱི་འབྱུང་གནས་གསུང་རབ་རིན་པོ་ཆེའི་མཛོད། (bde bar gshegs pa’i bstan pa’i gsal byed chos kyi ‘byung gnas gsung rab rin po che’i mdzod, TBRC Text) was translated by Lisa Stein and Ngawang Zangpo (Hugh Thompson) as Butön’s History of Buddhism in India and Its Spread to Tibet with Snow Lion/Shambhala Publications in the Tsadra Foundation Series.


Sarah Harding updated her classic work Machik’s Complete Explanation (an expanded edition in the Tsadra Foundation Series) with added texts on chod from Ranjung Dorje, གཅོད་བཀའ་ཚོམས་ཆེན་མོའི་ས་བཅད། (gcod bka’ tshoms chen mo’i sa bcad) and གཅོད་ཀྱི་ཊཱིཀཱ་ (gcod kyi ṭīkā).


 

In France, Christian Charrier finished the first volume of Au coeur du ciel, Le système de la Voie médiane dans la tradition kagyu by Karl Brunnhölzl (traduit de l’anglais The Center of the Sunlit Sky: Madhyamaka in the Kagyu Tradition).

 

 

 

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ALSO IN 2013

 

 

José Cabezón published a translation of Rog bande shes rab’s (166-1244) detailed presentation of the “nine vehicles” from the 13th century text གྲུབ་མཐའ་སོ་སོའི་བཞེད་ཚུལ་གཞུང་གསལ་བར་སྟོན་པ་ཆོས་འབྱུང་གྲུབ་མཐའ་ཆེན་པོ་བསྟན་པའི་སྒྲོན་མེ། (grub mtha’ so so’i bzhed tshul gzhung gsal bar ston pa chos ‘byung grub mtha’ chen po bstan pa’i sgron meTBRC Text) in The Buddha’s Doctrine and the Nine Vehicles: Rog Bande Sherab’s Lamp of the Teachings with Oxford University Press (320 pages, 978-0-19-995862-7).

 

 

 

 

More translations were also published in 2013 by the Padma Karpo Translation Committee. Recent publications from PKTC include Maitreya’s Sutras and Prayer With Commentary by Padma Karpo, translated by Tony Duff and Tamas Agocs, and A Bitwise Commentary on Entering the Conduct “A Lamp for the Path of the Middle Way by Drukchen Padma Karpo, translated by Tony Duff. And kindle versions of Five-Part Mahamudra by Padma Karpo and Five-Part Mahamudra by Situ Chokyi Jungnay are available on Amazon.

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

Elio Guarisco and Nancy Simmons produced a translation of Karma gling pa’s བར་དོ་ཐོས་གྲོལ། (bar do thos grol TBRC Text) in The Tibetan Book of the Dead: Awakening Upon Dying published with North Atlantic Books and Shang Shung Publications.

Donatella Rossi translated and edited A History of Zhang Zhung and Tibet, Volume One: The Early Period (264 pages, 978-1583946107) by Chogyal Namkhai Norbu. Published by North Atlantic Books.

The second volume is apparently available as The Light of Kailash from the Shang Shung Institute.

 

 

 

 

 



Martin J. Boord has updated, revised and expanded his The Cult of the Diety of Vajrakīla into this year’s  Gathering the Elements: The Cult of the Wrathful Deity Vajrakila According to the Texts of the Northern Treasures Tradition of Tibet (410 pages, 978-3-942380-10-2). Published by Edition Khordong at Wandel Verlag.

 
 
 

 
 

 

 

Also in 2013, Brill’s Tibetan Studies Library added two more to the series:

Tibetan Inscriptions (9789004250697)
Proceedings of a Panel Held at the Twelfth Seminar of the International Association for Tibetan Studies, Vancouver 2010
Edited by Kurt Tropper, University of Vienna and Cristina Scherrer-Schaub, University of Lausanne/École Pratique des Hautes Études, Paris

Monastic and Lay Traditions in North-Eastern Tibet (9789004255692)
Edited by Yangdon Dhondup, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, Ulrich Pagel School of Oriental and African Studies, London, and Geoffrey Samuel, Cardiff University

 

 

 

 

Brandon Dotson, Kazushi Iwao, and Tsuguhito Takeuchi produced an edited volume from the 2010 IATS in Vancouver, Scribes, Texts, and Rituals in Early Tibet and Dunhuang with Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag. Although not a translation per se, it gets an honorable mention for being the first (I believe) publication of collected essays from the 2010 meeting of the International Association of Tibetan Studies.
 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Harvard Oriental Series Volume 75 was published in 2013: The Foundation for Yoga Practitioners: The Buddhist Yogācārabhūmi Treatise and Its Adaptation in India, East Asia, and Tibet. This collection of essays was edited by Ulrich Timme Kragh and includes essays on the background and environment of the Yogācārabhūmi, the text and key sections therein, and a section each on Indian, East Asian, and Tibetan receptions to the text. The Tibetan section includes essays by Dorji Wangchuk, Orna Almogi, Ulrich Kragh, and Leonard van der Kuijp.

 

 

 

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COMING SOON

●    The Profound Inner Principles by Karmapa Rangjung Dorje, with commentary by Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Taye, translated by Elizabeth Callahan

●    Refining Our Perception of Reality, by Sera Kandro, translated by Ngawang Zangpo

●    The Wondrous Dance of Illusion: The Autobiography of Khenpo Ngawang Palzang, translated by Heidi Nevin and Jacob Leschly

●    When Clouds Part, Uttaratantrashastra, with commentary by Tashi Ozer, translated by Karl Brunnhölzl

●    Au coeur du ciel, Le système de la Voie médiane dans la tradition kagyu, vol 2, traduit de l’anglais par Christian Charrier

●    Naked Seeing: The Great Perfection, the Wheel of Time, and Visionary Buddhism in Renaissance Tibet by Christopher Hatchell of Coe College. 464 pages, expected in December 2013, published by Oxford University Press.
“This superb study brings to light some of the most esoteric and innovative contemplative practices ever to emerge within Asian religions. In clear and engaging terms, Hatchell explores how the visionary techniques of the Kalacakra and Great Perfection traditions work to undo our deeply engrained psychophysical habits and open us to new ways of seeing. The result is a study that will appeal not only to scholars and practitioners of Tibetan Buddhism, but to anyone interested in the phenomenology of sensory perception.” —Jacob P. Dalton, UC Berkeley

●    Colloquial Tibetan by Jonathan Samuels presents contemporary Lhasa Tibetan for beginners and includes CDs.

2 Responses to “Great Accomplishments: Tibetan Translations in 2013”

  • John:

    I may not be unbiased, but surely 84000 deserves a mention among Tibetan translation projects in 2013.

    Peer-reviewed English translations of fourteen works from the Kangyur have now been completed and published, including well-known sūtras like the Lalitavistara and Kāraṇḍavyūha, and also lesser known sūtras of considerable interest like the Karmāvaraṇaviśuddhi. The collection published so far also includes four tantras.

    Sixteen additional translations have been completed and are currently in the pre-publication phase, and a total of 74 further works are now in progress, representing 7,540 pages of the Degé Kangyur — 10 percent of the whole collection. The project is on target to produce translations of the complete Kangyur within 25 years, and Tengyur texts are now being commissioned, too.

    Translations are made in most cases according to the Tibetan, but with close attention paid to Sanskrit versions when they exist, as well as to variants among the different recensions.

    Publication is at present web-only, allowing access to readers worldwide free of charge. Several new developments of the 84000 “Reading Room” are under way.

  • Yes of course, thanks John! Here’s the link to the reading room (http://read.84000.co) and the Reading Room User Guide (http://84000.co/about/reading-room/).

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