Posts Tagged ‘Gene Smith’

A private screening of a new movie about the great scholar and collector of Tibetan texts, E. Gene Smith, will be shown in Boulder on December 15th, 2011.

You are invited to a special preview of the upcoming documentary,
Digital Dharma, the story of E. Gene Smith, founder of the Tibetan
Buddhist Resource Center (TBRC) and a pioneer in Tibetan Studies who
dedicated his life to finding, preserving and disseminating the rich
literary heritage of Tibet. Next week will mark one year since the
death of E. Gene Smith. An evening of remembrance on December 15th
will include a preview screening of Digital Dharma, the feature-length
HD documentary about Gene’s life’s work. www.digitaldharma.com.

This sneak peek of the film will be hosted for hundreds of worldwide
fans of the film’s central character via the virtual environment
platform of vcopious™, a Philadelphia-based global virtual environment
technology provider. The live event will be streamed from The 8th
Floor, a gallery and screening room in New York City. The local Rocky
Mountain showing will be at:

University of Colorado, Boulder Campus
ATLS 1B31 (on 18th Ave if you’re coming from Broadway)
Thursday December 15, 2011
4-6 pm

Map: http://www.colorado.edu/campusmap/map.html?bldg=ATLSLocal
Contact: Nicole Willock, University of Denver postdoctoral fellow
(nwillock@gmail.com)

Convened by Michael Sheehy and Jeff Wallman of TBRC, “Gene Smith: His Life and Work” was the first panel I attended at IABS 2011 Congress.

Michael Sheehy gave a formal presentation entitled “Banned Books, Sealed Printeries and Neglected Dkar chag” that described some fascinating research on the history of Takten Damchö Phuntsok Ling Monastery (where Tāranātha passed on) and its printery. He recounted three separate attempts to rescue the woodblocks of Jonang texts from the Phuntsok Ling printery by three different Tibetan lamas over several centuries following Tāranātha’s death. It is not until the efforts of Losal Tenkyong (blo gsal bstan skyong), a Zhwa lu Tulku who was close to Jamgon Kongtrul, that the printery doors were unlocked and a dkar chag of the texts found there was created.

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